French café starts charging extra to rude customers

This is a novel idea!  I haven’t written limericks for a long time and this theme seemed to fit in with that style of verse.  Have a go yourselves.Nice cafe

 

Merci

There’s a café I frequent down in Nice
where the waiters are “courtesy police”.
If you don’t say “bonjour
they’ll charge you much more.
For a coffee it’s double at least.

There’s a bistro I know in Bordeaux
where rudeness is definitely no-go.
Don’t say “s’il vous plait”,
you’ll be waiting all day
and your order may not even show.

In a bar in the town of Dijon
they’re strict on what’s right and what’s wrong.
If you don’t say “merci
they’ll fine you, you’ll see.
Two euros a cup’s added on.

At a restaurant in central Paris
it’s frowned on to be “impoli”.
If you swear or you curse
you’ll suffer the worse –
surcharged mercilessly.

So if you’re dining tête ê tête out in France,
be polite, you’ll get no second chance.
The staff can be tough
when enough is enough.
Just be friendly , enjoy the romance.

 

 

11th December 2013 – headline from the Independent

Notes:  “French café starts charging extra to rude customers.”  A small French café has taken the old adage that manners don’t cost you anything to its logical extreme – by charging extra to rude customers.  At La Petite Syrah in Nice, if you ask for “un café” it will set you back €7 (£5.80). If you also include the magic words “s’il vous plaît” you’ll get the same drink for €4.25, however – and it’s just €1.40 if you begin the order with a friendly “bonjour”.  Speaking to the French edition of The Local, café manager Fabrice Pepino said his staff had grown increasingly fed up with the bad manners of people in a rush on their office lunch breaks.  “It started as a joke because at lunchtime people would come in very stressed and were sometimes rude to us when they ordered a coffee.  “It’s our way of saying ‘keep calm and carry on,’” he said.

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3 thoughts on “French café starts charging extra to rude customers

  1. Pingback: La vie en France

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