Scotland mourns its dead as inquest starts into cause of helicopter disaster

A Eurocopter EC-135 owned and operated by Bond...

A Eurocopter EC-135 owned and operated by Bond Air Services re-fuelling at Glasgow City Heliport in Western Scotland. Glasgow Science Tower in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Last of the catchup poems following a very frustrating week of unexplained WordPress outage.  This is from 30th November and one of the UK’s worst urban aviation disasters of recent time.

 

One Glasgow Eve

Thrum, thrum, thrum, thru-um,
thru-um, thru-um, thru-u-um,
thru-u-um, thru-u-u-um,
thru-u-u-u  u-u  u-u.
Pin-drop silence.
No rotor drum nor motor hum
as the scything blades slice no more
and the broken bird that hovered
stone-drops from on high
at gravity’s behest
in its tumbling rush to death.

Crash!
The Clutha Vaults breaks its fall
and grieves the callousness of fate’s call
which brings the roof down
on ska band, Esperanza,
and its audience enthralled beneath,
expectant, unexpectant, unaware.
Esperanza.
The irony of hope
turned in an instant to despair
one Glasgow eve.

 

 

 

30th November 2013 – headline from the Guardian

Notes:  “Scotland mourns its dead as inquest starts into cause of helicopter disaster.”  A painstaking operation to recover the remains of at least eight people killed when a police helicopter crash-landed on a busy pub in Glasgow is continuing, with a final death toll yet to emerge.  Police still held out hope that survivors could be found, as rescue workers continued the difficult task of shoring up the shattered roof of the Clutha Vaults bar. The roof collapsed at 10.25pm on Friday night, trapping scores of customers, after the Eurocopter EC135 T2 suffered a catastrophic loss of power and hit the building, which stands on the banks of the river Clyde.  Up to 120 people were thought to have been inside the single-storey bar, one of Glasgow’s most famous pub music venues, where a local ska band, Esperanza, had been playing. Specialist search and rescue dogs from Trossachs mountain rescue team were brought in to search for victims and any possible survivors.  Alex Salmond, Scotland’s first minister, ordered flags to fly at half-mast on government buildings to mark “a black day for Glasgow and Scotland” as accident investigators tried to establish what had caused one of the UK’s worst urban aviation disasters of recent times.

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