Nanjiecun: A village that still lives and works as Mao laid down

Pictured here is former Chinese Chairman Mao Z...

Pictured here is former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong announcing the founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1 1949. Italiano: Immagine di Mao Tse-tung che proclama la nascita della Repubblica Popolare Cinese l’1 ottobre 1949 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There’s a village in Southern Spain which has also declared UDI and is following similar Maoist principles.  People seem happy with it but it does seem to require a trade-off – the idea of working for the community rather than self and the reduction of expectations in standard of living possibly balanced by a change in contentedness.

 

Community

Remember, remember the Little Red Book.
We looked, we looked at the Little Red Book.
We were hooked, we were hooked on the Little Red Book,
the philosophy, the mantra, the bible
of the red revolution,
the thoughts of the legendary Chairman Mao.
But where are they now,
those thoughts of Mao Zedong?
Long gone except in Nanjiecun,
the village which time forgot.
Mother, father, daughter and son,
brother, sister, everyone shares,
everyone cares,
everyone works,
nobody shirks,
all are in tune
with the geist of their Maoist commune.

 

 

 

 

 

 

24th November 2013 – headline from the BBC

Notes:  “Nanjiecun: A village that still lives and works as Mao laid down.”  Mao Zedong was a founding father of the People’s Republic of China. He died in 1976, but his presence is still firmly felt in the small village of Nanjiecun, where one of the country’s last Maoist communes shows no sign of giving up the ghost.  Rain or shine, in Nanjiecun village, at 06:15 every morning, the air is suddenly full of songs of praise for China’s mighty former leader, Mao Zedong. The anthems blare forth up and down the empty streets, from loudspeakers on every lamp post.  Nanjiecun is a place where time seems to have stood still, or even gone backwards. It is one of China’s very few remaining Maoist communes, a showcase for a vanished regime.  When the village returned to Maoist communal principles in the 1980s, it appears to have flourished, perhaps rather more than it did in the 1960s when Mao’s rigorous rule was the way the whole country was run, and millions perished in strife and famine.  Nanjiecun’s rural slums were replaced with apartment blocks – a traditional Chinese arch was erected at the entrance to the village.  Basic pay is low – the equivalent of £20 ($32) a month. But commune members also get rent-free apartments, with utilities and basic foodstuffs provided, plus education.

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2 thoughts on “Nanjiecun: A village that still lives and works as Mao laid down

  1. “But where are they now,
    those thoughts of Mao Zedong?”

    They are in the hearts of millions of exploited and oppressed people the world over. They still guide the theory and practice of revolutionary struggles in the heartlands of semi-colonial and semi-feudal countries like India and the Philippines.

    • Thanks for your comment which was encouraging. The essence of community described in the town of Nanjiecun seemed like a model that the rest of the world could learn from as a counter to the incessant insistence on economic growth which is at the root of so many of our problems

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