Postcard from… Lugano

Pietro Gori

Pietro Gori (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

lugano

lugano (Photo credit: lbolla)

I think all the write-ups of this incident talked of it as a “Mr Bean” moment.  My instant vision was of everything happening in slow motion so I’ve had a go at trying to reflect that in the language!  As for Lugano, a beautiful city; and I’ve borrowed the title from the old ‘folk song’ by Pietro Gori, with a little twist to the words.

Addio Lugano Bella

Addio Lugano Bella,
o dolce terra pia
benvenuto al inferno,
le giornaliste van via ……

Ssllooww mmoo
iinn Mmeennoo Uunnoo.
Tthhee sswwaannkkyy ggaalllleerryy.
Calamity.

Ssllooww mmoo
aarrmm lluunnggiinngg ffoorr aa nniibbbbllee,
eellbbooww aakkiimmbboo
kknnoocckkeedd oovveerr ‘iimmpprroonnttaa’,
priceless work of art.

‘Impronta’,
opaque glass disk,
earth-centred
in thousands of pieces.

‘Impronta’
ironically
representing longevity,
victim of levity.

Ssllooww mmoo
in Luuggaannoo.
Aa wwoorrkk bbyy Lluuciaannoo Ffaabbrroo,
smashed to pieces
in comedic tragedy.

Fractured scintillas
litter the floor.
Iconic ‘Impronta’,
a work of Arte Povera
lies shattered, an icon no more.

Addio Lugano bella ……

_______________________________________________________________
9th September 2013 – headline from the Independent

Notes:  “Postcard from… Lugano.”  In Lugano’s swanky Meno Uno gallery, a partying hack made a lunge for a passing nibble but instead knocked over and destroyed a priceless work of art. With the famous Swiss sense of decorum notably absent, “one guest at the preview,” intoned Radio Switzerland (RSI), “caught between a canapé and a chat with someone, unfortunately knocked over a work by Luciano Fabro and smashed it to pieces”.  It is, or rather, it was, the famous Impronta (Imprint) dated 1962-1964.  The sculpture, an opaque glass disk with a central impression of Planet Earth at its centre, was left in thousands of pieces. Ironically, the work was said by the author to represent the longevity of the world.  As one of the most celebrated works of the 20th-century Italian Arte Povera movement, experts had said it was difficult to value the piece.

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