A Fukushima fisherman’s tale: Radioactive water is flowing into the ocean at a rate of 300 tons a day

The Fukushima story rolls on relentlessly to affect generations to come.  A catastrophic disaster at the time but such a sad legacy as well.

Fukushima *

Fukushima * (Photo credit: Sterneck)

Fukushima Ghosts

Fukushima ghosts
of Nagasaki, Hiroshima.
Wraithes that float
along the desolation coast.

Fukushima waste.
Water laced with tritium
and caesium and strontium
and other ‘iums’ lasting eons,
half-lives fading in decay,
poisoning along their way.
Seas enriched with nuclear spoil.
Molluscs, fish, squid shrivel, die;
environment destroyed.
And the tick of geigers clicking
just like crickets on a summer’s day.

Fukushima ghosts of those who died.
Fukushima ghosts of who survived.
Fukushima ghosts of those who will not be.
Victims of the unseen particles
that leach relentless now
into the glowing Fukushima sea.

7th August 2013 – headline from the Independent

Notes:  “A Fukushima fisherman’s tale: Radioactive water from the Daiichi plant is flowing into the ocean at a rate of 300 tons a day.”  A survey released today by Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry said water laced with caesium and other radioactive materials is flowing into the ocean at a rate of 300 tons a day. The ministry, which oversees the nuclear industry, said it could not rule out the possibility that the water has been leaking into the Pacific since the crisis began more than two years ago.  The recent admissions have forced the government to step into what many experts now consider the world’s most complex ever nuclear clean-up.  That news is a disaster to fishermen like Mr Yoshio Ichida.  Just 27 miles up the coast from the small harbour town of Soma, radioactivity from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant leaks into the ocean, and into the sardines, mackerel and squid that three generations of Mr Ichida’s family once caught.  Every Thursday he and his colleagues learn the latest radioactive readings from the sea. “Until recently, we only detected caesium, but now we detect strontium, which has a much longer life-span,” he says.  He and hundreds of other fishermen who used to work the Fukushima coast now while away their days mending nets and boats they may never use.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s