Susan Taylor dies during English Channel charity swim

Sometimes headlines are about ordinary people trying to do good, with tragic results.

Lying in Wait

Shape-shifting death,
lacuna in the continuum of fate,
lying in wait,
indifferent, uncaring,
ensnaring whoever first ventures along.
Why when you’re young
does dying seem so wrong?
Why, when you’re strong, healthy and fit
does it seem so unjust?
Why, when you’re doing your best, doing good
should fate intervene?
Why when you’re almost done, nearly there
does it dare to condemn you?

Susan Taylor knew.
Only thirty-four.
More than channel-swimming fit
she faced the open sea,
raising money for Diabetes UK
and the Rainbows Hospice,
her special charity.
Pushing, challenging, going strong, then tragedy;
something went critically, cruelly wrong
one mile out from the final shore
and Susan Taylor knew for sure
fate intervenes in all we do.

Married, two lives shared.
Determined, she cared.
Brave, she dared.
Why did fate not spare her
on this day?

 

15th July 2013 – headline from the BBC

Notes:  “Susan Taylor dies during English Channel charity swim.”  Susan Taylor, 34, from Barwell, Leicestershire, died in Boulogne on Sunday after she “suddenly collapsed” on the final part of her challenge, trying to swim across the English Channel for charity.  She was doing the 21-mile endurance test to raise money for Rainbows Hospice in Loughborough and Diabetes UK.  Rainbows Hospice opened in 1994 and is dedicated to children and young people.  Its chief executive Geoff Ellis said: “Susan was a wonderful woman who would do anything for anybody. She has been a much loved ambassador at Rainbows for over two years, helping out at events and tirelessly fundraising for us.

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